1. Keynote: “Multicultural & Social Justice Lens: Beyond Deaf-Centric Approaches.”

• Presenter: SooHyun Tak, MA, LPC, Director, Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program, Department of Counseling, Gallaudet University

• Bio: SooHyun Tak is a licensed professional counselor and a faculty member of the Master’s Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. where she also serves as the program director. Prior to joining the department faculty, she had been provided a wide range of advocacy and mental health counseling services for 20+ years to deaf, hard of hearing, and deafblind individuals in various settings, ranging from residential treatment milieu for children to community-based agencies.She has given presentations at both local and national conferences on topics about diversity at the workplace in an effort to raise awareness on the potential impact of providers’ cultural values, biases, and attitudes on the delivery of services to their clients.

• CE Pending approval: 1.5

• 0.15 RID Professional Studies CEUs*

• Abstract: With ever-increasing diversity in the American society, multicultural and social justice counseling have become necessary components of the provision of mental health services. These skills will help providers address cultural and social issues that marginalized diverse populations encounter daily at individual and system levels.

Over the last few decades, the percent of d/hh/db population with intersectional identities, including immigrants and refugees, has also grown significantly.  Many of them come from collective cultures where the concept of western, male-Eurocentric based independence or individuality are not part of their cultural value system.  This disconnect may unintentionally leave the clients, thus impacting their families, feel uncomfortable with the counseling process. While Deaf-centric approaches are essential to the quality of mental health services to the population, multicultural and social justice counseling will allow the providers to work with clients and their families from a culturally contextual framework and be able to recommend culturally appropriate interventions at individual, community, and system levels.

• Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

  • Explain the importance of interpersonal awareness and discuss how personal beliefs, values, and attitudes may impact the quality of mental health services.

  • Identify the 6-8-step process for implementing multicultural and social justice interventions.

2.  “Anchoring Change Through Language Accessibility for Deaf Adolescents with Mental Health Needs”.

• Presenters: Dru Balsley, LMHC, Senior Mental Health Clinician & Valerie Farr, LMFT, Mental Health Clinician

• Bio: Dru Balsley, LMHC is currently Senior Clinician at The Learning Center for the Deaf Walden School residential program. In comparison to other cultures and populations both trauma and language deprivation are significantly higher within the deaf community, and based on her own personal experiences and challenges with the therapeutic system, Dru has made it her mission to be able to provide trauma-informed care to adolescents who need it in their native language. Within her current role, Dru provides both individual and family therapy, develops and provides in-house trainings for staff members, and acts as an agency liaison specializing in deaf services.

 Valerie Farr, AMFT, is currently a Mental Health Clinician at Walden School, residential treatment program for deaf children with emotional and behavioral difficulties, under The Learning Center for the Deaf in Framingham, MA. Valerie has spent most of her professional career in advocating deaf individuals and families in mental health system. Valerie has maintained her purpose in providing trauma-informed care to families and children with full communication accessibility. Valerie also provides individual, family, group therapy, support groups, in-house trainings for staff members, and facilitates multidisciplinary clinical meetings.

• CE Pending approval: 1.5

• 0.15 RID Professional Studies CEUs*

• Abstract: Accessibility is vital for any individual’s treatment; however, the multifaceted challenges a deaf individuals may face requires advocacy, education and competence to navigate the system. Over the last 30 years, WaldenSchool at The Learning Center for the Deaf has faced numerous challenges both internally and externally. This has pushed the clinical team to bolster approaches including identifying needs for the individual, collaboration with external agencies and continued exploration of better solutions.  Systems have been established within the community to provide accessibility in case of a psychiatric emergency and relationships formed between the clinicians and key players in each individual’s care. Information and resources have been provided to educate hospitals, police officers, and mobile crisis team to better understand Deaf culture as well as the rights of each individual involved. This workshop will focus on barriers encountered as well as unique and creative ways Walden school has successfully (and unsuccessfully, at times) navigated these circumstances in order to provide the best care for our clients. Lastly, adaptations of trauma-informed interventions to meet the needs of the population to ensure quality of care will be shared as well.

• Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

  • Identify three barriers one may experience when navigating the mental health system as a Deaf individual or as a clinician advocating for a deaf individual.

  • Identify three strategies Walden School has utilized to address access-related challenges.

3. Deaf-centric: Nothing About us Without Us.

• Presenters: Elisa Valles, M.A. In-Home Therapist & Intensive Care Coordinator, Walden Community Services & Ashley O’Niell, Executive Director of Walden Community Services

• Bio: Elisa Valles has been working at Walden Community Services since 2015. She started as an intern and became a clinician in 2016. Her focus is in trauma-informed care within families and working with Deaf populations. Elisa has been trained in the ARC- GROW program which is a curriculum designed for families with children who have trauma with the idea of self-modulation and self-regulation. She also has experience with Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and has utilized this with several families. Elisa hopes to continue doing research in trauma-informed care and underserved families. 

 Ashley O’Niell, Executive Director of Walden Community Services (WCS) at The Learning Center for the Deaf, graduated with both Bachelor degree (2005) and Master degree (2010) in Social Worker from Gallaudet University and is currently a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker in Massachusetts. WCS adopted the Wraparound model as our first service back in 2005 through MassHealth (Medicaid) as the only specialized Community Service Agency (CSA) that serves Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals and their families in the entire state of Massachusetts. WCS provides services such as in home services (In-home Therapy, Family Partner, and Therapeutic Mentor).  WCS is working on setting up an Outpatient Clinic with clinical psychologist and psychiatrist support. Ashley is also coordinating two conferences (Mental Health Conference 2019 and ADARA Breakout 2020).

• CE Pending approval: 1.5

• 0.15 RID Professional Studies CEUs*

• Abstract: In a panel discussion, our Intensive Care Coordinator (ICC), IN-Home Therapist (IHT), Therapeutic Mentor (TM), and Family Partner (FP), as well as a parent who received services and a youth who also received services, will discuss their experiences working together at WaldenCommunity Services. Participants will hear from clinicians, staff, parent, and youth about their experiences working in a team and with various agencies. Specific attention will be placed on how conflict (clinical need vs, family need) was managed as well as how the team came to shared understanding of what constitutes success. Families will share their successes and concerns and WCS will also share their success and concerns as the work evolved from the beginning to the completion of the case. 

• Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

  • Explain the value of the 10 principles of Wraparound.

  • Compare/contrast the experience of a client/parent with the experience of a provider.

  • Justify the need for “system work” to occur in conjunction with “family work.”

4. “Trauma and Its Impact on Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children”.

• Presenters: Joseph Batiano, LMHC, NCC & Morag MacDonald, APRN

• Bio: Joseph Everisto Batiano, deaf himself, is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor for the State of Rhode Island, a Certified School Counselor with Rhode Island Department of Education and a National Certified Counselor, is a school counselor for Rhode Island School for the Deaf since 2012. He has over 10 years of experience with providing counseling services ranging from individual, family, and/or group therapy including academic support/career exploration in an educational setting. Batiano graduated from Gallaudet University in Washington, DC with Master of Arts Degree in School Counseling with Mental Health Emphasis. He obtained his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Communications with Honors. Batiano had several articles published. He travels around the country providing presentations on topics ranging from providing appropriate services for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing, Trauma Informed Care for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing, or utilizing Creative Techniques in Counseling. Batiano is a member of a variety of associations pertaining to the field of counseling and deafness such as the Rhode Island School Counselor Association, American School Counselor Association, ADARA, and is Vice-President of the National Counselors of the Deaf Association. He is a strong advocate for accessibility to mental health services for those who are deaf and/or hard of hearing. Batiano was also recently awarded the 2018-2019 Rhode Island School Counselor of the Year by the Rhode Island School Counselor Association (RISCA) an affiliation of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). He is the first Deaf recipient of such award on both the state level and national level. He will be eligible for the ASCA's 2020 National School Counselor of the Year. 

 Morag MacDonald, APRN, - In-Home Therapist (IHT) for Walden Community Services through The Learning Center for the Deaf. (Profoundly Deaf since birth) Graduated from University of Massachusetts in Amherst with a BS in Nursing. Received MSW from University of Connecticut School of Social Work. Has MS in Nursing from St. Joseph College in West Hartford, CT. Master thesis focused on the lived experience of Deaf adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Currently working as IHT working with children with mental health diagnosis and their families - someone in the family (child or the parent) has hearing loss. Recently retired after 34 years with the State of CT. Worked for various Mental Health Programs (26 years with Deaf Services). Adapted and developed visual handouts for DBT groups and TARGET groups and TREM (Trauma recovery groups) for the d/Deaf. Provided numerous workshops throughout the country related to adapting groups for the d/Deaf as well as providing education about Deafness related to mental health and interpreting. Provided mental health consultation with BRS and supported employment services. Featured in a chapter in Leave No Nurses Behind: Nurses Working with DisAbilities by Donna Carol Maheady.

 • CE Pending approval: 1.5

• 0.15 RID Professional Studies CEUs*

• Abstract: Too often professionals in this field are not aware of trauma and how it differentiates between those who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Hearing people including that of risking re-traumainting our clients/students. Coverage on the topic will include but not limited to general Mental Health 101 symptomatology with Adults/Children, Language/Cultural Dysfluency, Stages of Development with trauma, and boundaries as well as ethical dilemmas. Review, discussion including scenarios will cover the various wide scope of trauma as well as the fight, flight, and freeze mode when coping with trauma. Understanding the psychological, psychosocial, and biological impacts of trauma will be presented. To better understand trauma, we can then identify alternative and healthier approaches that may be beneficial for those who are Deaf/HOH while treating the trauma itself. This also addresses how to minimize/ risking re-traumatizing. To understand Trauma INformed Care and establishing an ideal setting in our workplace. The discussion will also include vicarious trauma and self-care.

• Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

  • Identify at least 2-3 ways trauma is different for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing population. 

  • Identify at least 2-3 ways trauma impacts the brain, the social emotional well being and physically. 

  • Identify at least 2-3 effective strategies to use when working with those with traumatic experiences.

5. “Evidence-Based Practices for Whom? Lessons Learned from Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.”

• Presenter: Lori Day, Ph.D. Licensed Psychologists; Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Gallaudet University; PCIT Level 1 Trainer

• Bio: Dr. Day is a licensed psychologist and an Associate Professor of Psychology in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program at Gallaudet University where she is engaged in training the next generation of psychologists who will support the behavioral health of deaf and hard of hearing people through teaching, research, and clinical practice. As the Director of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) Research and Training Clinic, she has worked to develop a cultural adaptation model for evidence-based interventions and utilized this framework to support the provision of accessible clinical services to deaf and hard of hearing persons. She is also a certified therapist and Level 1 Trainer for Parent-Child Interaction Therapy. Additionally, she is the co-investigator on a funded project to empirically study attitudes toward working with deaf and hard of hearing Clinical Psychology Trainees, which is part of a larger initiative to remove barriers and build pipelines for deaf and hard of hearing students to enter mental health professions.

• CE Pending approval: 1.5

• 0.15 RID Professional Studies CEUs*

• Abstract: Deaf and hard of hearing communities experience barriers to obtaining fully accessible and affirmative mental health care services. These barriers include limited research on the efficacy of mental health treatments and outcomes of clinical services with individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing and lead to the disparity in the number of deaf and hard of hearing individuals who are able to obtain culturally and linguistically affirmative mental health services. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is one of the few interventions that has been studied with diverse deaf and hard of hearing families and has shown promising efficacy in reducing disruptive behaviors and increasing positive parenting skills. This presentation will provide an overview of PCIT, including examples of the core positive attention and discipline skills utilized, while also discussing the cultural adaptation process that has been used to adapt this intervention for deaf and hard of hearing families. A summary of the data available on PCIT with deaf and hard of hearing families will also be shared. Additionally, specific examples of how this adaptation framework can be applied to other mental health interventions will be highlighted and recommendations for tracking clinical outcomes of interventions will be discussed.

• Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of the seminar, participants should be able to:

    • Identify and discuss the positive attention and discipline strategies utilized in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.

    • Identify three cultural adaptations that have been made to Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for deaf and hard of hearing families.

    • Identify two methods for tracking clinical outcomes in therapy.

 

*MassRID is an approved RID CMP Sponsor for Continuing Education Activities. This Professional Studies program is offered at 0.75 CEUs/ACETs (0.15 CEUs per workshop) at the Little/None Content Level.


October 3, 2019
at Verve Crown Plaza 

1360 Worcester Street
Natick, MA 01760

For further information please contact:
MHConference@tlcdeaf.org


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